Beware the Hidden Dangers of Vaping: One Bohra Doctor’s Campaign to Educate Students

In recent years, the popularity of vaping has surged among both adults and adolescents, with many turning to electronic cigarettes as an alternative to traditional smoking.  Some even view it as a harmless pastime.  Counteracting misinformation about vaping, Dr Mulla Murtaza Salem – a consultant vascular surgeon at Queens Medical Centre in Nottingham and a member of the Dawoodi Bohra community of Leicester – recently made an eye-opening presentation to students at Leicester Grammar School on the alarming health risks associated with this activity.

According to Dr. Salem, “As we strive to lead healthier lifestyles, understanding the risks associated with vaping is paramount to making informed choices and safeguarding the future well-being of our communities.”

Facilitated by Khuzema Esmail, the Head of Life Education at Leicester Grammar and a fellow member of the Leicester Bohras – Dr Salem shared his expertise on the harm caused by vaping, and emphasized the need for education on the dangers of this seemingly innocuous habit.  During a productive interactive session, he also challenged the students to critique the societal myths around this habit.

Firstly, Dr Salem debunked the idea that the act of vaping involves only inhaling water vapour.  In fact, e-cigarettes contain various harmful chemicals like nicotine, propylene glycol, and glycerin.  Many also contain additional flavourings and additives, some of which can be harmful when inhaled.  These include carcinogenic substances such as formaldehyde and benzene; heavy metals, such as nickel, tin, and lead from the coils used to heat the e-liquid; and cinnamaldehyde, commonly used to add a cinnamon flavor but which can be toxic to the cells in the human respiratory system.

According to Dr Salem, “The tobacco industry and manufacturers have wrongly marketed vaping products as a cleaner and less harmful alternative to smoking, leading to an influx of users, especially among the younger teenage demographic.  Despite the UK introducing a vaping ban for under 18s, vaping is in fact being targeted towards younger age groups.”

Dr Salem showcased the links between vaping and health risks such as nicotine addiction, lung injuries, cardiovascular damage and miscellaneous injuries, including burns.  He voiced concern that the highly-addictive nature of vaping can act as a gateway to traditional smoking, especially among young people, with the subsequent risk that users of vaping devices become lifelong smokers.  Worse still, this addictive substance can negatively impact brain development in young users. 

Commenting on the presentation, Leicester Grammar School teacher Khuzema Esmail said, “His Holiness Syedna Mufaddal Saifuddin, the head of the Dawoodi Bohras, regularly counsels members of the faith to steer away from addictive substances, such as vaping devices, while helping local communities to see the effects that such habits can cause.  Dr. Salem’s presentation was an eye-opener, and I have no doubt that our students are in no doubt about the dangers of vaping.”

Dr. Salem reflected, “Maintaining physical and mental health and fitness – and providing guidance to younger generations – are priorities of the Dawoodi Bohras.  Providing adolescents with the information they need to make healthy choices – such as avoiding the hidden dangers of harmful activities like vaping – is essential to society as a whole.”

One thought on “Beware the Hidden Dangers of Vaping: One Bohra Doctor’s Campaign to Educate Students

  1. Naseem says:

    Well presented clear informative article dealing with such a dangerous subject in respect to health issues and healthy well understood subject criteria. Thank you Dr Murtaza Salem your input greatly appreciated. Thank you

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *